Leadville 100-The Race Across the Sky

This ain’t no powder puff race!

Epic, iconic, awesome and legendary are words you commonly here when people talk about having run a 100 mile race, which are all true when talking about Leadville, but what about legacy? How many races out there are not only changing our lives as runners but those of people in their local community? How many races make you really feel part of an extendable family?

Race co-founder Ken Chlouber, an avid marathon runner dreamt up the race as a way to make Leadville famous and attract visitors during the 1980’s after the closure of the Climax mine which was a major blow to the towns economy, putting the town as the highest unemployment level in the USA overnight as thousands lost their jobs. The first race was held in 1983 and has been held annually since. The race starts and finishes in Leadville, Colorado on an out and back course on trails and dirt roads through the heart of the Rocky Mountains climbing and descending 15,600 feet (4,800m) with elevations ranging between 10,200-12,600 feet (3,100-3,850m). The altitude adds that extra element of brutality which results in most years having only a 50% finishing rate. 2018 was no exception with only 52% of starters making it across the finish line before the 30hr cut off.

The Leadville 100 strips you down to your raw inner and you’re reborn when you cross that finish line, life changed forever. But the local lives are changed too. Every year since 2002 the race, through the Leadville Trail 100 Legacy Foundation, gives a $1,000 scholarship to every graduate from high school, helping to set them up on a path to success. Their mission is to support the needs of Leadville, Lake County community and build a better, brighter tomorrow, while respecting their mining heritage.

It’s no wonder that the support along the course is second to none! The community love and embrace the race spirit and they are there to do what they can to help each and every runner reach the finish. Checkpoints morph into small festivals with fire pits and parties absolutely on point.

4am start with Ken & Marilee at the helm

Starting in the dark at 4am the race sets off at a quick pace with a relatively downhill start to the first checkpoint, puncturing the night sky with head torch light trails and whoops of excitement from 750 runners amid plenty of friendly chatter and stories from the trails. The story of a bear sighting along this very trail only a few weeks back sticks with me through the race. Sunrise along Turquoise Lake welcomes us to May Queen at 13.5 miles.

Sunrise at Turquoise Lake

The first real climb of the day is quickly upon us as we head up Sugarloaf Pass on a very runnable but deceivingly draining up hill, some runners choose to run this, but I opt for a running start moving into a power hike before reaching the top and enjoying a really fun downhill stretch known as Power-line to The Outward bound checkpoint at 23.5 miles.

Feeling strong out of Outward Bound

The second climb takes place up Mt Elbert after going through Half Pipe checkpoint, it’s not the full way to the top of the mountain but it’s still a hefty ascent to combat before reaching Twin Lakes where my crew are waiting patiently for me ready to get me sorted again at 37.9 miles in.

Heading out of Twin Lakes packed and ready to take on Hope Pass

Refuelled and refreshed heading out of Twin Lakes I pop on some tunes to help keep my cadence hoping that I can keep up a good pace up Hope Pass. Two small ankle deep river crossings chill me right down as I wade through freezing water but wet feet don’t bother me and I shriek and laugh as I cross through.

Loving the river crossing!

I snap open my hiking poles as I see the ascent of the pass ahead and altitude quickly takes its toll. I go from moving well to a slow motion hike that doesn’t seem to be getting me anywhere fast but my legs are like lead and my chest is so tight I feel like I can’t breath, I feel runners coming past me but I’m too paralysed to do anything more than the crawl I’m managing. Frustratingly slowly and painfully I make it to Hopeless aid station and refuel before tackling the last 200m ascent before some relief back down the other side to Winfield. As soon as I’m heading down hill my legs free up and the more I descend the better I can breath and I start to pass a few people again. I feel disoriented by this as I’m normally a stronger climber than a descender but the altitude has flipped this all on its head. Ken’s words ‘Make friends with pain and you will never be alone’ were echoing in my ears loudly.

Obligatory selfie on top of Hope Pass, making pain my friend!

I’m greeted at the halfway point at Winfield, 50miles and just under 13 hours, by my first pacer Aaron, a total stranger to me until today. I love this about the running community, you only have to seek out support and you find it. I now have 2 new life long friends who both sacrificed their weekend to join me through the night to help me get to the finish. Aaron is keen to get me moving quickly and we don’t hang about the aid station and within minutes we are back on the trail and commencing the steep ascent back up Hope Pass.

Seriously in the pain cave heading back up Hope Pass for the 2nd time! (Photo credit : Aaron)

We are literally heading home now but the thought doesn’t motivate my legs into action, we crawl up Hope Pass as the wind picks up and the sun starts to make its descent. Jackets, buffs and gloves thrown on we get over the pass and back at Hopeless aid station Aaron has to pull me away from the warm camp fire to get going. We need to make up time as I’ve now eaten well into my good head start of the cut offs and the concerns of chasing cut off times starts to kick in. The 30 hour cut off set for the race is very tight and it certainly means there is no time to rest at the check points as you can all so easily lose valuable time and miss out on finishing like 48% of starters this year did.

Up and Up!

It’s dark before we reach Twin Lakes again so head torches are back on and we tackle the freezing river crossing in the dark which certainly wakes me up! And then we make it to Twin Lakes now 62.5 Miles in and making cut off by only half an hour. Dion, my husband, who has been crewing since the start is there and he offers forceful encouragement and I can see concern is all over his face; he knows how badly I want this belt buckle and he fears this is slipping out of my reach. At no point have I felt like quitting, I have come into this race with the right intentions and the positive mindset with the mantra from the race briefing still ringing in my ears “I commit, I won’t quit”.

We head off again into the dark and it’s straight back into a climb up Mt Elbert, again my legs are like lead and I start to feel really queasy and continuously struggling for air, with bouts of dizziness which has Aaron worrying as I keep stumbling. As we finally reach the top the heavens open for a downpour saturating us before we make the next checkpoint. It’s here I put on every layer I have, 2 base layers, 2 waterproof jackets, buff and gloves to try and get warm again. Aaron forces me to eat more than I have at any other checkpoint and we get down to Half Pipe at 71.1 Miles where we’ve now managed to make up 10 mins and we are 40 mins ahead of cut off, the time hangs over my head somewhat as 40 minutes isn’t really that much in the scheme of things and I know I need to keep digging deep if I am going to be awarded that finishers buckle.

We change pacers at Outward bound station 76.9 miles and James joins me to get back up Power Line, that really fun downhill now has to be climbed! It’s the first time I’ve spoken to James in person and within 10 minutes I’m double over and vomiting no doubt making a great first impression. Somehow the vomit makes me feel better and we ascend the hill so much stronger than the last 4 climbs. James is loving it and pushes me to get a jog on again when we reach the top for the descent back into May Queen at 87.8 miles, passing about 50 runners, where Dion and Aaron are surprised to see us down already.

Daylight breaks again

The sun is just starting to rise as Aaron joins me for the final leg to the finish, just 12.6 miles to go and we’ve got just over 3 hours to make it but on tired legs this doesn’t mean it’s in the bag but I can feel it, I can feel I’m going to get that belt buckle and I surprise Aaron with my refound energy and we start playing a game of Pac-Man, every person we see we aim to catch them and we end up passing 50 runners to the finish line.

Enjoying my game of Pac Man!

That finish line! Before you enter the town of Leadville you can hear the cheers and applause which spurs you on and as you turn onto 6th street you still can’t quite see the finish line but the streets are lined with local support. Everyone has come out to cheer us all on and the noise is deafening, tears start flowing as I get choked up by the emotion of it all knowing that I am minutes away from finishing my first 100. As we get closer we can see the finish line, the uphill finish line I might add, and we start to plan how to position me for the finishers photo, under strict instructions from Dion to make sure I leave a gap between runners so he can get a good photo. We decide to pass a couple more, then a couple after that until finally my feet hit the red carpet and I’m running under the banner and into the waiting arms of Merilee. Tears are flowing and I look up to catch Dion also crying, embraces and photos and more hugs from James and Aaron, and of course Ken. I’m on cloud nine, I’ve done it, I’ve raced across the sky where legends are created and limits are tested. I gave the mountains my respect, and earned respect from all. Ken tells me ‘Finishing this race will change your life. It truly has and it will change your life too if you let it.

One very happy 100 mile finisher!

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Why you simply HAVE to run the Marathon du Mont Blanc

I. Loved. Every. Single. Minute.
A marathon of true beauty! Marathon du Mont Blanc is more than just a race, this is a party of trail running that takes place in one of THE Mecca’s of the sport, Chamonix. Traversing through the awe inspiring nature reserve, The Aiguilles Rouges, this event has eight various trail races (90k, 42k, 23k, 10k, VK, duo etoile night race, mini cross and the young marathon) to choose from and is a celebration of mountain running at its finest. The marathon had 2,300 runners and the electrified start at 7am on Sunday morning set goosebumps off on every competitor. The streets are lined with fans cheering on the runners but not just at the start, throughout the race through the villages and high up on top of the mountains they were there in so many ways from the loud trumpet blowers, cheering baton bashers, live bands with singers and throngs of dancers to the cute kids offering high fives and cheers of “Allez! Allez!”

Jam packed race start

With 42km and 2,780m ascent this is a tough and challenging route, made all the more difficult with temperatures reaching 32 degrees in the valley. Starting in the cooler temperatures of the early morning you are pulled into a false sense of ease as the route takes you from Chamonix into the cross country trails up through La Lavancher (I did manage to face plant only 3 Miles in on the least technical descent of the day), following the Petit Balcon Nord to Montroc and along the nature reserve running along the Col de Montets.

Views for days

The valley is in full bloom, greenery all around and bright flowers absolutely everywhere and running into Vallorcine felt like a dream. Masses of people lined the path into the checkpoint and there was a lively dancing band boosting energy levels before the first serious climb of the day up to Col Des Posettes. Aid stations are laden with local cheeses, salamis, fruit, nuts, baguettes, dark chocolate and plenty of still/sparkling water and coke. It’s certainly worthwhile taking advantage of what’s on offer. All usually served by super friendly volunteers and accompanied by some form of live music or dancing, it’s a party for everyone from the runners and volunteers to the locals and random hikers.

Stuffing salami in my mouth at Vallorcine where Jana was supporting (Photo: Jana)

All the runners are made to feel like superstars as we tackled the climb which again was lined with loss of exuberant supporters, all reading our names on our bibs to shout out personal encouragement. It gives you a taste of what the Tour de France cyclists feel like with the people crowding onto you on a narrow path, it’s absolutely electrifying! As the path narrowed and disappeared into the forest the crowds disappeared and gave way to solid hard work, with only the sounds of heavy breathing and the rhythmic ‘tap, tap’ of hiking poles as we ascended.

Heading up to the Col

The heat was pretty intense up on the Col but alleviated by an amazingly enthusiastic man playing guitar and singing on the back of a small truck. Plenty of runners were using this as a reason to hang at the checkpoint and soak up the party vibes and snap some stunning photos. We reached the summit of Aiguillette at 2201m and then headed down the steep descent of 850m back to Le Tour, the aid station before the climb up to Flegere. I tackled the descent with gusto, taking the steep rocky paths with tight bends and the odd sheer drop in my stride and it was over in no time!

A man and his guitar!

The final big push up to Flegere was a pretty slow procession of runners, now only hiking, in the heat of the day, some needing to sit on the side of the path to re-gather strength before carrying on. I had to resort to filling up water in the stream as I’d drunk my bottles dry, 1L, in the climb alone. The scent of wild strawberries was in the air and they tasted even better than they smelt, sunkissed, red & ripe.  Flegere loomed in front of us and felt within touching distance but felt more like slow motion process up a long wide, open climb in the blazing sun to get there.

An oasis on a mountain

Fuelled on coke at long last, I’d saved this for the final stretch, I felt fully charged and got a bit frustrated on the final 5k which was single track and was quite a bottle neck in parts so using my best French ‘excuses-moi’ I got my way last as many people as I could along the tight balcon with a vertical drop off on your left. You could see and hear the finish line the entire 5k, tempting you!

The finish line looms!

2 small snow drifts to cross just before the finish and it was there! Plan Praz was in front of me with the finish up a small hill which of course you have to run and seeing Dion, Gobi and Jana at the finish I let out a big whoop and massive smiles all round I got my medal.

Finish line feels (Photo : Dion Leonard)

I can’t recall a race where I felt like I smiled and laughed the entire way around so Marathon Du Mont Blanc will certainly go down in my memory as the funnest and most scenic marathon I’ve ever run.

Loving my medal!

Explore, Discover, Race – Bodrun 50km 2016

The call to prayer sounds out across the dark empty streets of Bodrum where runners are huddled in the breaking dawn; warming up before the inaugural Bodrun 50km.  It’s late November and the morning air is cool but the runners are all dressed for the heat that’s expected later in the day to reach up to 25 degrees.  Bodrum is located on the southern peninsula of Turkey with Greece in touching distance across the pristine blue waters of the Aegean Sea and enjoys warm temperatures year around so a perfect winter escape.

Views of the Aegean Sea during the race

With a choice of 3 distances; 50km, 23km and 10km the race offers an option for all abilities to take part.  The 50km route duly delivered on its promise to offer a challenge with 1,900m worth of climbing through technical trails taking you on the peaks above Bodrum city and back along the coastline.  A mixture of terrain as you run through small villages on cobbled roads connected via dusty fire trail paths and rocky goat tracks through the steep cliffs with an almost irresistible temptation to dive into the crystal-clear water as the final 10k includes a stretch along the pebbly coastline.

Stunning crystal clear water

The races intertwine in the final 10km with the 50k runners coming across the 23k runners from the other direction giving way to camaraderie in the form of friendly cheers and well wishes as the runners cross paths and the hospitable nature of the Turkish volunteers is apparent along the way at the checkpoints ensuring smiles and encouragement are plentiful.  People are the true reflection of a country and you will be hard pressed to find more friendly and welcoming people than the Turkish.

2nd Place for me!

What better way to recover from race soreness and truly indulge in the local culture with a couple of hours in a traditional Turkish Hamam where you will be steamed and scrubbed until you are squeaky clean and ready to sit back and feast on some of the local delicacies to truly aid your recovery.  With seafood as the specialty you will be spoilt for choice matched by the freshest of salads and completed by Turkish tea and baklava.

After run treats of Baklava and Turkish Tea

Turkey; a country of cultures colliding where East meets West in an evocative pot of smells, sounds and experiences; offers an easy yet adventurous getaway for Europeans and Brits able to combine a long weekend of competitive racing in an exotic location with the cultural escape of a holiday destination that’s remarkably easy on the pocket.  Try something truly unforgettable yourself today and Explore, discover and race.

My article in print in Trail Running Magazine (incorrectly noted as Dion Lennard ;-0)

TransGranCanaria Take 2

After having completed the Transgrancanaria (TGC) 125km race in 2015 by the skin of my teeth against the cut off time I was keen to go back and run it again and improve on my last experience.

This time however I decided to ‘only’ sign up for the 62km version as I thought this would be a nice start to the training for the year. After reviewing my race calendar for the year however, I realised that I would not have enough points for my 2019 UTMB application and needed to either find some more races to add or upgrade a couple. So just a few days out from the race start I decided to upgrade from the 62km to the full 125km race.

What could possibly go wrong? To begin with I hadn’t run more than 16 miles as a long run in training since the start of December 2017, my diet wasn’t great with an extended Christmas and an inability to motivate myself to get out and train in the miserable conditions of what felt like the longest Scottish winter ever. Enough excuses!

I had thankfully set a plan working on improving my strength and conditioning with 2-3 solid sessions a week since the beginning of December as ultra running had worn my body out a bit, I noticed I had lost my mobility and struggled to even get off the toilet without hanging onto it. I started working with Tom Sparks, Osteopath & strength & conditioning coach, on a plan of action including biomechanics and mobility work and after a couple months I’m now able to sit into a squat and pat my dog and pop straight back up!

As I’d now upgraded to the full 125km race route this was to be my opportunity to test my new found strength and mobility and to see how the muscles coped with some serious mountains to tackle. I somehow knew in my own mind that my endurance training of past would see me through the distance.

I wasn’t expecting Spanish heat this time of year but the weather forecast for Gran Canaria was unseasonably very Scottish with heavy rains and winds. The grim weather was so bad even the marathon event was postponed from the Friday to Saturday. This was making wardrobe decisions a little tougher than usual but I still opted for my WAA skort and went with short sleeves matched with arm sleeves for extra warmth, along with E gloves, buff and waterproof jacket– sunglasses left firmly behind!

Fireworks & party atmosphere to start us off

The race starts at 11pm at night from the beach at Las Canteras, set off in a party of live music and fireworks it would be easy to get caught up in the fast start and burn yourself out early. My husband, Dion’s, words rung in my head ‘If it’s feeling good, drop it back a gear & just take it easy, save your legs’, so I did.

Night time beach start

Night running is a different experience, especially in a big race such as this, other racers lights can interfere with your own making it difficult to see in front of you so I like to have a fairly robust lumens to make sure mine is outshining others. I used LED Lenser MH10 for this race with 600 lumens which was great. Frustratingly halfway through the night my rechargeable battery was already failing and I had to stop to change to normal batteries, silly error. The night seemed to pass quickly and I was happy to see the sun starting to rise and realising I was well ahead of where I was when the sun rose 3 years ago was definitely a mental boost. The daylight also gave way to the stunning views surrounding me which had me simply awestruck!

Sunrise

The climbs and descents in this race are unrelenting and I was thankful I had my Guidetti poles this time around, they really make a difference to the level of fatigue in the legs. I was also keeping myself well fuelled, drinking Active Root between checkpoints and ensuring I was eating well at each stop along the way. The weather was not only holding out but the sun made an appearance and I hit the hottest part of the day as the ascent to Roque Nublo began.

Ascending Roque Nublo

I took advantage of a cold stream before beginning the climb to cool my head and wet my buff around my wrist which made me feel refreshed at least for a few minutes. The climb up was quite stifling with a lack of breeze but after the cold Scottish winter I wasn’t complaining. I was chatting away to a couple of fellow runners when I ran into my WAA twin, Emma (and hubby Ryan) they were laughing as they could hear me coming obviously having way too much fun. It was great to see a couple of familiar faces along the way but I didn’t want to stay and chat too long as my goal was to get to Garanon before 5 and still had the summit to reach. After the obligatory summit photo I was off on the downhill stretch to Garanon.

With my WAA Twin, Emma

I was stoked to reach Garanon at 4:45pm, ahead of schedule! Garanon has hot food and massages, I cheekily took advantage of my 15 min time gain and enjoyed a quick quad massage while I wolfed down a bowl of pasta and a chocolate milk. I was excited to be heading out with a marathon to go feeling strong and relatively fresh, thinking I knew what lay ahead I was also excited to think I could possibly get into the finish by midnight which would have meant a 25 hr finish. Little did I know the last 30k of the race were different to 3 years ago….and not in a good way!

Obligatory summit photo!

It’s a short climb out of Garanon before a descent down a very rocky path known as the quad buster for obvious reasons, but this year with stronger, fresher legs and still being in daylight instead of darkness I really enjoyed this path and jogged my way to the bottom to Tunte. I was feeling super positive and genuinely having a great time.

Coming out of Garanon – pure focus!

I was met at Tunte by my Spanish friend and local, Yosimar, greeting me with a prosciutto sandwich which I devoured on the spot. A quick chat and I was off, buoyed by seeing another friendly face and ready to tackle the last 30 odd kilometres to the finish with some gusto. That was until the route changed from what I was expecting. I had been expecting a couple of rough descents from memory but then also a lot of runnable sections but was disappointed to find the last section not playing to my strengths. Frustratingly I picked my way down an extremely long and technical descent before finally reaching the bottom which was a horrendously rocky river bed which went on forever! From race information this forever was actually 8km of the rockiest most unrunnable river bed I’ve ever been in. It was now dark and surrounded by head height reeds I felt I was trapped in a horror movie. By the time the river bed finished, my feet were done in as was I and the remaining 10km were a painful slog to the finish.

With Yosimar at Tunte

I was met by Anna-Marie’s husband Ben (my fellow WAA athletes and roomies) about 3km to the finish, she’d finished quite a few hours ago (7th lady in 19hrs) so I was really surprised and happy to see him when the heavens promptly opened up to drench us for a couple of minutes. The finish line loomed in front and I managed to put on the ultra shuffle to cross the line. I had done it! 26 hours and I was done.

Finish line smile!

As always with these extreme races the pleasure is more Type 2 fun, with the enjoyment and immense feeling of satisfaction coming a day after finishing when you join your fellow competitors in the slow shuffle post race, proudly wearing your finishers shirt.

I’m pleased with my result, I hadn’t planned nor trained for the 125km distance but yet I had a good improvement on my previous result (by over 3 hours) and I could feel the impact of the strength training in my legs not only during the race with less fatigue and feeling stronger but also my recovery was much quicker than ever before. Will I do TGC again? I think I actually might! I’d love to come to this race in even better shape, having trained specifically for it to see what I could really do and it’s a fantastic event in such a beautiful part of the world that there might just have to be a third time lucky!

Morocco Tizi n Trail 2018

Tizi means mountain pass in Morocco, but this event could easily be called ‘Sahib n Trail’ meaning friends & trails. Imagine a lovely long weekend away in the sun, running undiscovered and remote trails in a country full of culture and colour. Add to this the security and comfort of a fully supported event where you sleep in traditional Berber tents atop mattresses and kept warm with blankets, with showers and facilities at the ready with 3 meals a day provided. Yet you are away from the modern world connectivity where your entertainment is watching the sun rise and set, partake in some relaxing tai chi and making new friends.

Tizi n Trail has been holding 3 day events in Morocco since 2013. After attending Tizi n Trail in 2017 and having the most amazing experience I couldn’t resist returning in 2018 with some fellow trail runners. There was 7 in the group of us; Suzan my cousin from The Netherlands; Annabel a friend via twitter from Australia; Angie, Michaela and Grace all running related friends based in Edinburgh and Danielle a friend of Grace’s from Cheshire and myself. One of the great things about the Tizi n Trail organisation is that they change locations every year, so you can keep coming back year after year and experience a totally different part of Morocco. The 2018 edition was in Essaouria, a port city on Morocco’s Atlantic coast. Its medina (old town) is protected by 18th-century seafront ramparts even used in series ‘Game of Thrones’.

 

The official start line. (photo courtesy of Paul Vilcot)

Strong “Alizée” coastal winds have allowed this quaint seaside town to retain its traditional culture and character. For most of the year, the wind blows so hard here that relaxing on the beach is impossible meaning that most tourists bypass this hidden gem, although a renowned location for windsurfers from April to November, luckily for us this meant a tail wind to help us through the race!

Tail winds keeping us moving (photo courtesy of Paul Vilcot)

There were 140 starters and we all wandered to the main square in the port for the official start photos before we headed to the beach for the actual race start. Day 1 was 16 miles of  beach running with a few dunes towards the back half to really test us out. After a long UK winter it was enjoyable just to be running in the sun and soaking up the rays as we ran along the endless stretch of beach. The participants soon spread out as we found our own rhythm and pace; the race caters for all levels whether you are a first time multi stage runner, would prefer to walk or are a seasoned runner. Just over 2 hours of running and the finish line is in sight and Michaela, Angie and I cross over hand in hand after a fun day out. Lunch of sandwiches and fresh local fruit is provided and we head back to the beach to watch the rest of the runners come in for the day.

Having way too much fun! (photo courtesy of Paul Vilcot)

The camp is a bivouac nestled up in the dunes with tents set up to sleep 8 along with a communal dining area, shower and toilet facilities with the entertainment being of everyones stories of the day as the sunset before we tucked into a delicious, hearty dinner of spaghetti bolognese and salads with Berber tea (mint) before we all retired to our beds for a comfortable nights sleep.

Sunset in camp

Waking naturally to the sounds of the waves, everyone was ready for breakfast from 7am consisting of Moroccan pancakes and breads with a selection of jams and honey all washed down with tea/coffee and juice. After packing our stuff away & bags stored on the trucks; no self sufficiency here; the organisers transport your luggage from camp to camp, we were ready to face Day 2. 12 miles over amazing scenery with river beds and high coastal paths, technical and challenging with donkeys and camels as living obstacles along the way. We finished the day together again on a deserted beach, apart from our camp, absolutely idyllic and some of the runners and myself braved the Atlantic Ocean for a rather quick dip to soothe our tired muscles. It may be a warm 20 degrees celsius outside but the water was only about 18 degrees but it was perfect recovery for the next days final stage.

Magical spot for our camp (photo courtesy of Paul Vilcot)

Again the sunset captures our attention and we enjoy another evening chatting away with friends, new and old, before we enjoy a Moroccan feast of couscous, tagine and barbecued meats before settling back into our tents for another comfortable nights sleep. This event is such a lovely introduction to multi day running, with comfort and warm hospitality making the recovery of the body that much quicker and easier to manage than other self-sufficient races, its definitely more of a holiday than a gruelling adventure such as the likes of Marathon des Sables.

Tai chi on the beach (photo courtesy of Paul Vilcot)

The clocks go forward during the night but this matters to no-one as we awake and indulge in a tasty breakfast before congregating on the beach for our final start which will take us straight up a jebel (mountain) to begin wth before heading inland over rocky terrain and flower fields for 14 miles before a final stretch along the beach to the finish line.

Michaela leading the charge through the flower fields with Angie and Rachid

People like to challenge themselves with everyone running for different reasons and it is simply amazing to see people of all walks of life complete these events and whilst doing it learn something about themselves and become better people.

Happy bunch of finishers!

The final night consists of the awards ceremony and a banquet of delicious Moroccan food, and the bar is open! Additional celebrations ensued as one of our group; Suzan won the ‘Encouragement award’ and was called on stage to applause and had to give a small speech, richly deserved and fully appreciated by a runner that just absolutely loves to run.

Suzan receiving her award

We were all sad to leave the next day, the 3 day event had gone by all too quickly but what a fabulous experience was had by all with new friendships forged through the camaraderie between us all. We all promise to return for a reunion next year for Tizi n Trail 2019 which is going to see the event heading to the mountains, starting at Lake Takerkoust (only 30mins from Marrakech) before heading to Asni and finishing up at Oukaimeden where we will be in the shadow of Mount Toubkal, the highest peak in the Arab world. Perhaps we should tag a few days on to climb this mountain.

Sunset in Essaouira (photo courtesy of Suzan Haring)

If you are interested to join me next year please get in touch as I am the English speaking contact for the event and will help you in your planning and organisation and of course be there as well. It’s a life changing event and you won’t be disappointed. For further details on the event visit
http://www.go2events.fr/transmarocaine-tizi-n-trail/programme-tizi-ntrail-2019/

 

Burgos Ultra Stage Race

The dark sky was tinged with the promise of the day ahead as the deep sound of the beating drums and horns emanated from the forest.  Our group of 23 runners walked purposefully towards the sounds with some trepidation and nervousness of what lay ahead.  We had come from all parts of the world to run the Way of Legends, a 250 km stage race that traverses along the historic pilgrimage path of Saint James to the finish line at the Cathedral of Burgos, a magnificent world heritage site.  We all had a shared goal; to become a legend in our own right and complete this grueling and challenging race whilst experiencing the natural beauty, culture and gastronomy of this amazing region crossing through different landscapes reliving each stages own legend as we went.  As we came upon the sounds we could now see the Druids that had come to bless us on our path, their ancient dialect translated for us as they gave each of us poison berries to take in the event of capture.

Check out my video of the race here:

As we set off the dawn broke and we witnessed a spectacular sunrise and eased our legs into the first few kilometres of the 48 km day ahead.  The race is a fully catered event except for your fuel during the race, so a small rucksack (I used a 3L Waa Ultra bag) is all that is required for you to carry to include the mandatory kit along with your food and drink. Don’t be led to believe that the lack of self sufficiency makes this race ‘easy’.  To run over a marathon a day for 5 days straight through varying degrees of technicality and some chunky ascents & descents, with all extremes of weather at both ends, meant that we were all truly tested and our legs were feeling the pain and fatigue by the end of the week.

Beating the drums with Stan

What a revelation a catered multi day race is after running self sufficient events!  At the end of each day the wonderful team of professional chefs cooked up amazing organic and vegan option meals.  Lunch always consisted of a soup of the day and a selection of prosciutto, cheeses, guacamole and bread with the option of wine and beer if you so desired.  Then a full dinner followed and you awoke to coffee and a tasty breakfast to set you up for the day.

Dinner time!

Different to all other stage races this one has amazing and uniquely comfortable camps with beds, hot showers and massages available.  On the night before the final stage we slept in the Monastery of San Pedro Cardeña and were each treated to our own individual Shamanic drum ceremony with the wonderful Oscar Martine before embracing the spiritual sounds of the monks final songs at the end of the evening.

With Oscar the Sharman and my finishers medal

We were all touched spiritually during this race in our own ways, and this became apparent at the awards ceremony on our final night together where most of the runners felt the desire to share with the group how much they were feeling, not just how they were feeling but how much.  Something had opened up in all of us and the outpouring of emotions from everyone was something I had not experienced before, we all had to dig deep during the week and we had all been there for each other.  I will always treasure the memories and the unique finishers medal; a bespoke design by Oscar the Shaman which represents a helmet and therefore a legend, but when turned upside down represents the phoenix and rebirth ‘a rising from the ashes’.  The race is limited to 36 competitors so will always retain this magical feel so don’t delay in signing up, I’d highly recommend it!

Happy finishers

My Kit list:

 

 

 

Run Talk

I get asked a lot of questions and see the same on social media about how to manage the whole ‘running’ thing from how to fit it all in and how to keep the body fit and well so I put a few thoughts online.

What does my average training week look like?

My average training week is pretty full on, I train 6 days a week, of which I make sure included is at least one session of each hill repeats, speed, strength and a long run. As I build up my mileage increases as I build towards an event this results in some days being double training sessions so both before and after work, but ALWAYS a rest day.

Advice for runners struggling to fit in the miles?

Have a real honest look at your time schedule, where are you wasting time on things like watching TV or sitting of social media (guilty!) and use that time to get out for a run. Look to combine ‘jobs’ with a run?  Can you run to work, or get off the bus/train a few stops earlier and run? Need to pick something up at the shops, run there and back? Still short for time then get up half an hour or an hour earlier and head out for a few miles.  I find the dark, cold mornings are a bit easier with a Lumie light to wake me up and having my clothes laid out ready to go.  No excuses right?!?!

My favourite or best post-run recovery techniques?

I love a chocolate milk after a long run followed by a lovely soak in a warm bath, then getting my Supacore compression tights on with my feet up on the couch, including a 20 min foot/toe stretch with my yoga toes on.  I have a strong love/hate relationship with my foam roller as well, though I am sure my sports masseuse would prefer I did it a LOT more regularly.  A good yoga session the following day is always good to stretch out properly, especially hot yoga.  I treat myself to a good sports massage after any big race or just when I feel my body needs it.

(**Get 10% discount from Supacore by using code – Lucja10 – applicable off any items including sale items**)

Foam rolling in my Supacore compression #doublerecovery

Top tips on essential kit for trail running?

I don’t hit the trails without a few basics in my bag including a first aid kit with safety blanket, emergency food & water, head torch, WAA Ultra waterproof jacket, buff, EGlove gloves & extra layers to keep warm. On me will always be my Suunto watch to track my run and maps and a good pair of trail shoes that work for you.

(**Get 20% discount from WAA Ultra equipment by getting in touch with me directly for an individual code**)

My nutrition tips for runners?

I’m fuelling with good, healthy & nutritious meals before and after runs and I wouldn’t head out for a long run without some Active Root, a natural ginger sports drink which not only gives me enough energy to run and keep me hydrated but the natural reaction of ginger settles my stomach, something which I have struggled with in the past on long runs.  I try to stick to real foods on the run to keep up the energy levels and shy away from gels unless it is towards the end of a race.

What motivates me out on the trails when the going gets tough?

My competitive streak! The fact that I’m either racing or training for a race motivates me and especially if it is a race and I know people are following my results, I’m even more keen to do well.

My advice to anyone who wants to take up running!

Keep it fun but have a focus, signing up to a race/s works for me but what drives you? Is it a PB over a distance, building up to be able to run a certain distance or time, completing a certain race/challenge, or just feeling fitter and stronger? Whatever motivates you, use it, focus on it and enjoy it.