Leadville 100-The Race Across the Sky

This ain’t no powder puff race!

Epic, iconic, awesome and legendary are words you commonly here when people talk about having run a 100 mile race, which are all true when talking about Leadville, but what about legacy? How many races out there are not only changing our lives as runners but those of people in their local community? How many races make you really feel part of an extendable family?

Race co-founder Ken Chlouber, an avid marathon runner dreamt up the race as a way to make Leadville famous and attract visitors during the 1980’s after the closure of the Climax mine which was a major blow to the towns economy, putting the town as the highest unemployment level in the USA overnight as thousands lost their jobs. The first race was held in 1983 and has been held annually since. The race starts and finishes in Leadville, Colorado on an out and back course on trails and dirt roads through the heart of the Rocky Mountains climbing and descending 15,600 feet (4,800m) with elevations ranging between 10,200-12,600 feet (3,100-3,850m). The altitude adds that extra element of brutality which results in most years having only a 50% finishing rate. 2018 was no exception with only 52% of starters making it across the finish line before the 30hr cut off.

The Leadville 100 strips you down to your raw inner and you’re reborn when you cross that finish line, life changed forever. But the local lives are changed too. Every year since 2002 the race, through the Leadville Trail 100 Legacy Foundation, gives a $1,000 scholarship to every graduate from high school, helping to set them up on a path to success. Their mission is to support the needs of Leadville, Lake County community and build a better, brighter tomorrow, while respecting their mining heritage.

It’s no wonder that the support along the course is second to none! The community love and embrace the race spirit and they are there to do what they can to help each and every runner reach the finish. Checkpoints morph into small festivals with fire pits and parties absolutely on point.

4am start with Ken & Marilee at the helm

Starting in the dark at 4am the race sets off at a quick pace with a relatively downhill start to the first checkpoint, puncturing the night sky with head torch light trails and whoops of excitement from 750 runners amid plenty of friendly chatter and stories from the trails. The story of a bear sighting along this very trail only a few weeks back sticks with me through the race. Sunrise along Turquoise Lake welcomes us to May Queen at 13.5 miles.

Sunrise at Turquoise Lake

The first real climb of the day is quickly upon us as we head up Sugarloaf Pass on a very runnable but deceivingly draining up hill, some runners choose to run this, but I opt for a running start moving into a power hike before reaching the top and enjoying a really fun downhill stretch known as Power-line to The Outward bound checkpoint at 23.5 miles.

Feeling strong out of Outward Bound

The second climb takes place up Mt Elbert after going through Half Pipe checkpoint, it’s not the full way to the top of the mountain but it’s still a hefty ascent to combat before reaching Twin Lakes where my crew are waiting patiently for me ready to get me sorted again at 37.9 miles in.

Heading out of Twin Lakes packed and ready to take on Hope Pass

Refuelled and refreshed heading out of Twin Lakes I pop on some tunes to help keep my cadence hoping that I can keep up a good pace up Hope Pass. Two small ankle deep river crossings chill me right down as I wade through freezing water but wet feet don’t bother me and I shriek and laugh as I cross through.

Loving the river crossing!

I snap open my hiking poles as I see the ascent of the pass ahead and altitude quickly takes its toll. I go from moving well to a slow motion hike that doesn’t seem to be getting me anywhere fast but my legs are like lead and my chest is so tight I feel like I can’t breath, I feel runners coming past me but I’m too paralysed to do anything more than the crawl I’m managing. Frustratingly slowly and painfully I make it to Hopeless aid station and refuel before tackling the last 200m ascent before some relief back down the other side to Winfield. As soon as I’m heading down hill my legs free up and the more I descend the better I can breath and I start to pass a few people again. I feel disoriented by this as I’m normally a stronger climber than a descender but the altitude has flipped this all on its head. Ken’s words ‘Make friends with pain and you will never be alone’ were echoing in my ears loudly.

Obligatory selfie on top of Hope Pass, making pain my friend!

I’m greeted at the halfway point at Winfield, 50miles and just under 13 hours, by my first pacer Aaron, a total stranger to me until today. I love this about the running community, you only have to seek out support and you find it. I now have 2 new life long friends who both sacrificed their weekend to join me through the night to help me get to the finish. Aaron is keen to get me moving quickly and we don’t hang about the aid station and within minutes we are back on the trail and commencing the steep ascent back up Hope Pass.

Seriously in the pain cave heading back up Hope Pass for the 2nd time! (Photo credit : Aaron)

We are literally heading home now but the thought doesn’t motivate my legs into action, we crawl up Hope Pass as the wind picks up and the sun starts to make its descent. Jackets, buffs and gloves thrown on we get over the pass and back at Hopeless aid station Aaron has to pull me away from the warm camp fire to get going. We need to make up time as I’ve now eaten well into my good head start of the cut offs and the concerns of chasing cut off times starts to kick in. The 30 hour cut off set for the race is very tight and it certainly means there is no time to rest at the check points as you can all so easily lose valuable time and miss out on finishing like 48% of starters this year did.

Up and Up!

It’s dark before we reach Twin Lakes again so head torches are back on and we tackle the freezing river crossing in the dark which certainly wakes me up! And then we make it to Twin Lakes now 62.5 Miles in and making cut off by only half an hour. Dion, my husband, who has been crewing since the start is there and he offers forceful encouragement and I can see concern is all over his face; he knows how badly I want this belt buckle and he fears this is slipping out of my reach. At no point have I felt like quitting, I have come into this race with the right intentions and the positive mindset with the mantra from the race briefing still ringing in my ears “I commit, I won’t quit”.

We head off again into the dark and it’s straight back into a climb up Mt Elbert, again my legs are like lead and I start to feel really queasy and continuously struggling for air, with bouts of dizziness which has Aaron worrying as I keep stumbling. As we finally reach the top the heavens open for a downpour saturating us before we make the next checkpoint. It’s here I put on every layer I have, 2 base layers, 2 waterproof jackets, buff and gloves to try and get warm again. Aaron forces me to eat more than I have at any other checkpoint and we get down to Half Pipe at 71.1 Miles where we’ve now managed to make up 10 mins and we are 40 mins ahead of cut off, the time hangs over my head somewhat as 40 minutes isn’t really that much in the scheme of things and I know I need to keep digging deep if I am going to be awarded that finishers buckle.

We change pacers at Outward bound station 76.9 miles and James joins me to get back up Power Line, that really fun downhill now has to be climbed! It’s the first time I’ve spoken to James in person and within 10 minutes I’m double over and vomiting no doubt making a great first impression. Somehow the vomit makes me feel better and we ascend the hill so much stronger than the last 4 climbs. James is loving it and pushes me to get a jog on again when we reach the top for the descent back into May Queen at 87.8 miles, passing about 50 runners, where Dion and Aaron are surprised to see us down already.

Daylight breaks again

The sun is just starting to rise as Aaron joins me for the final leg to the finish, just 12.6 miles to go and we’ve got just over 3 hours to make it but on tired legs this doesn’t mean it’s in the bag but I can feel it, I can feel I’m going to get that belt buckle and I surprise Aaron with my refound energy and we start playing a game of Pac-Man, every person we see we aim to catch them and we end up passing 50 runners to the finish line.

Enjoying my game of Pac Man!

That finish line! Before you enter the town of Leadville you can hear the cheers and applause which spurs you on and as you turn onto 6th street you still can’t quite see the finish line but the streets are lined with local support. Everyone has come out to cheer us all on and the noise is deafening, tears start flowing as I get choked up by the emotion of it all knowing that I am minutes away from finishing my first 100. As we get closer we can see the finish line, the uphill finish line I might add, and we start to plan how to position me for the finishers photo, under strict instructions from Dion to make sure I leave a gap between runners so he can get a good photo. We decide to pass a couple more, then a couple after that until finally my feet hit the red carpet and I’m running under the banner and into the waiting arms of Merilee. Tears are flowing and I look up to catch Dion also crying, embraces and photos and more hugs from James and Aaron, and of course Ken. I’m on cloud nine, I’ve done it, I’ve raced across the sky where legends are created and limits are tested. I gave the mountains my respect, and earned respect from all. Ken tells me ‘Finishing this race will change your life. It truly has and it will change your life too if you let it.

One very happy 100 mile finisher!

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Burgos Ultra Stage Race

The dark sky was tinged with the promise of the day ahead as the deep sound of the beating drums and horns emanated from the forest.  Our group of 23 runners walked purposefully towards the sounds with some trepidation and nervousness of what lay ahead.  We had come from all parts of the world to run the Way of Legends, a 250 km stage race that traverses along the historic pilgrimage path of Saint James to the finish line at the Cathedral of Burgos, a magnificent world heritage site.  We all had a shared goal; to become a legend in our own right and complete this grueling and challenging race whilst experiencing the natural beauty, culture and gastronomy of this amazing region crossing through different landscapes reliving each stages own legend as we went.  As we came upon the sounds we could now see the Druids that had come to bless us on our path, their ancient dialect translated for us as they gave each of us poison berries to take in the event of capture.

Check out my video of the race here:

As we set off the dawn broke and we witnessed a spectacular sunrise and eased our legs into the first few kilometres of the 48 km day ahead.  The race is a fully catered event except for your fuel during the race, so a small rucksack (I used a 3L Waa Ultra bag) is all that is required for you to carry to include the mandatory kit along with your food and drink. Don’t be led to believe that the lack of self sufficiency makes this race ‘easy’.  To run over a marathon a day for 5 days straight through varying degrees of technicality and some chunky ascents & descents, with all extremes of weather at both ends, meant that we were all truly tested and our legs were feeling the pain and fatigue by the end of the week.

Beating the drums with Stan

What a revelation a catered multi day race is after running self sufficient events!  At the end of each day the wonderful team of professional chefs cooked up amazing organic and vegan option meals.  Lunch always consisted of a soup of the day and a selection of prosciutto, cheeses, guacamole and bread with the option of wine and beer if you so desired.  Then a full dinner followed and you awoke to coffee and a tasty breakfast to set you up for the day.

Dinner time!

Different to all other stage races this one has amazing and uniquely comfortable camps with beds, hot showers and massages available.  On the night before the final stage we slept in the Monastery of San Pedro Cardeña and were each treated to our own individual Shamanic drum ceremony with the wonderful Oscar Martine before embracing the spiritual sounds of the monks final songs at the end of the evening.

With Oscar the Sharman and my finishers medal

We were all touched spiritually during this race in our own ways, and this became apparent at the awards ceremony on our final night together where most of the runners felt the desire to share with the group how much they were feeling, not just how they were feeling but how much.  Something had opened up in all of us and the outpouring of emotions from everyone was something I had not experienced before, we all had to dig deep during the week and we had all been there for each other.  I will always treasure the memories and the unique finishers medal; a bespoke design by Oscar the Shaman which represents a helmet and therefore a legend, but when turned upside down represents the phoenix and rebirth ‘a rising from the ashes’.  The race is limited to 36 competitors so will always retain this magical feel so don’t delay in signing up, I’d highly recommend it!

Happy finishers

My Kit list:

 

 

 

Run Talk

I get asked a lot of questions and see the same on social media about how to manage the whole ‘running’ thing from how to fit it all in and how to keep the body fit and well so I put a few thoughts online.

What does my average training week look like?

My average training week is pretty full on, I train 6 days a week, of which I make sure included is at least one session of each hill repeats, speed, strength and a long run. As I build up my mileage increases as I build towards an event this results in some days being double training sessions so both before and after work, but ALWAYS a rest day.

Advice for runners struggling to fit in the miles?

Have a real honest look at your time schedule, where are you wasting time on things like watching TV or sitting of social media (guilty!) and use that time to get out for a run. Look to combine ‘jobs’ with a run?  Can you run to work, or get off the bus/train a few stops earlier and run? Need to pick something up at the shops, run there and back? Still short for time then get up half an hour or an hour earlier and head out for a few miles.  I find the dark, cold mornings are a bit easier with a Lumie light to wake me up and having my clothes laid out ready to go.  No excuses right?!?!

My favourite or best post-run recovery techniques?

I love a chocolate milk after a long run followed by a lovely soak in a warm bath, then getting my Supacore compression tights on with my feet up on the couch, including a 20 min foot/toe stretch with my yoga toes on.  I have a strong love/hate relationship with my foam roller as well, though I am sure my sports masseuse would prefer I did it a LOT more regularly.  A good yoga session the following day is always good to stretch out properly, especially hot yoga.  I treat myself to a good sports massage after any big race or just when I feel my body needs it.

(**Get 10% discount from Supacore by using code – Lucja10 – applicable off any items including sale items**)

Foam rolling in my Supacore compression #doublerecovery

Top tips on essential kit for trail running?

I don’t hit the trails without a few basics in my bag including a first aid kit with safety blanket, emergency food & water, head torch, WAA Ultra waterproof jacket, buff, EGlove gloves & extra layers to keep warm. On me will always be my Suunto watch to track my run and maps and a good pair of trail shoes that work for you.

(**Get 20% discount from WAA Ultra equipment by getting in touch with me directly for an individual code**)

My nutrition tips for runners?

I’m fuelling with good, healthy & nutritious meals before and after runs and I wouldn’t head out for a long run without some Active Root, a natural ginger sports drink which not only gives me enough energy to run and keep me hydrated but the natural reaction of ginger settles my stomach, something which I have struggled with in the past on long runs.  I try to stick to real foods on the run to keep up the energy levels and shy away from gels unless it is towards the end of a race.

What motivates me out on the trails when the going gets tough?

My competitive streak! The fact that I’m either racing or training for a race motivates me and especially if it is a race and I know people are following my results, I’m even more keen to do well.

My advice to anyone who wants to take up running!

Keep it fun but have a focus, signing up to a race/s works for me but what drives you? Is it a PB over a distance, building up to be able to run a certain distance or time, completing a certain race/challenge, or just feeling fitter and stronger? Whatever motivates you, use it, focus on it and enjoy it.

Wee Eck

The latest edition to the Scottish Ultra running scene hit the shores of the Cowal Peninsula on Saturday 8th October for its inaugural run. The 50k Dunnon Ultra event which can be run as an ultra or you can choose to run this event as a relay, ensuring the event is open to all different abilities. (check out the route here)

When I saw a message on Facebook from Fiona Outdoors looking for one more runner for her relay team I couldn’t resist a trip out to West Scotland, renowned for its stunning beauty. I’d also never run in a relay before so thought this might be a fun option for something different.

Having never met my team mates before, Fiona and Nick, I was assured we were not going to compete we were purely there for fun*. Getting to Dunoon already feels like an adventure as after heading out from Glasgow you reach McInroy’s Point at Gourock and board the ferry to cross over the Firth of Clyde. We were blessed with a stunning day so this made the crossing all the more magical.

Return ferry crossing with Fiona with the sunsetting

Return ferry crossing with Fiona with the sunsetting

The race starts from the Benmore Botanical Gardens in amongst the magnificent giant redwood trees, which can be reached by a 15min drive from the ferry stop, though a coach transfer is provided as part of the event. The race starts at a very civilised time of 10am and is now being dubbed as the most scenic ultra in Scotland. The race kicked off to the sounds of bagpipes and canons, no countdown or fog horn to start proceedings here.

Stunning start line amongst the Redwood trees

Stunning start line amongst the Redwood trees

Nick Green was our first runner, an experienced triathlete who took the first leg, which he said was no doubt the toughest leg of the race where the runners headed north climbing high above Loch Eck to reach the highest point of 335m before a 2 mile descent brought him to transition 1 where Fiona took the batton with us in 5th place overall for the relay.

Nick and Fiona change over at Transition 1

Nick and Fiona change over at Transition 1

Fiona took off like a shot along the flattest part of the route following the loch shore closely heading back to the Botanical Gardens for transition 2. Flying into T2 she flung the batton to me after pushing us into 3rd place overall. “No pressure Lucja, but run!!!” I didn’t even have time to put her Suunto watch on which she was using to track the entire route and just shoved this into my pocket (this is where the WAA carrier shirt I’d pinched from hubby, Dion’s,  drawer came into good use), not time to waste, I had a position to uphold.

Run Lucja, Run!

Run Lucja, Run!

After a short flat section the 3rd legs ascends on forest trails towards Dunoon, the views were absolutely stunning from the top of the woodlands of Bishop’s Glen where I could see the finish of the restored Dunoon Pier for at least 5 miles before I go there! I didn’t have time to stop for any runfie’s though, I had just rounded up another relay runner putting us in 2nd overall so had to hot foot it for the final descent into Dunoon. It felt good to run with a bit of pressure like that where I wasn’t just running for myself but I had a ‘team’ to worry about. Running is normally such an independent sport that I found the relay team element quite encouraging and exciting, so much so I would consider doing this again.

I was greeted by cheers and hugs as I came across the finish at Dunoon Pier, we were 2nd relay team overall but 1st mixed team! What a result! Considering we were here only to have fun, we did very well. The finish line was a bustle of fun and activity with plenty of hot food (free for the runners) and cakes to restore the energy levels along with a massage.

Finish line smiles

Finish line smiles

The race entry is £33, with an early bird discount at £23 for the first 100 entrants which includes tea & coffee with fresh pastries at registration, coach transfer, changing facilities and the full event support with electronic chip timing, check points, drop bags with food & water stations, first aid back up and of course a fabulous goody bag.

Goody bag included a lovely medal made from the redwoods, keyring, wine, water and a t-shirt

Goody bag included a lovely medal made from the redwoods, keyring, wine, water and a t-shirt

*Fun in Fiona’s book is to compete as hard as humanly possible 😉

**My entry to this race was free as part of Fiona’s relay team entry – however after having done the race I do think the race offers great value for money!**